Happy Hanukkah 2020!

Wishing you a very Happy Hanukkah from CCA! We hope you are in good health and have a safe (and sparkly) holiday! 

In 2018, we celebrated the holiday with COLOR !!!

Our Art Adventurers explored color-mixing by making their own age-appropriated color wheel with watercolors!

We then took inspiration from the Bauhaus painter, Wassily Kandinsky & created our version of his concentric (bulls-eye) circle color studies… But included some radiating Hanukkah Lights! (Goal: Complementary, Neutral, Warm & Cool)

*As a boy, Kandinsky’s father became an owner of a tea factory. Kandinsky enjoyed during his childhood years, the piano, cello and drawing. “I remember that drawing and a little bit later painting lifted me out of the reality, he wrote later.” He was always keen on the arts but his parents had other interests in mind. They had him attend law school and he became a successful “Professor to the Department of Law.” Though in his thirties, he ended his career in law and went after his passion in drawing! He attended art schools in Europe and became very successful after his 2nd attempt at schooling in the arts. He then travelled with his latter wife in Europe for five years and then settled down in Murnau at the bottom of the Alps. He soon started painting beautiful, colorful “spots and lines [which] was gradually superseding images of reality.” This is what sparked our love for color! (Unknown, 2008-2020)

*“A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.” 

-James Keller  (Silberman, 2020)

*Silberman, Jeff (2020) Uplifting Hanukkah Quotes to Read This December. Website retrieved from https://rebekahlowin.com/hanukkah-quotes/

Unknown (2008-2020). The Biography. Website retrieved from https://www.wassilykandinsky.net/

Quarantine Shmorenteen

The pandemic has provided for more “home time” than ever before… which has lended new emerging artists (+ kids!) to “think outside of the box” as they have been “inside a box” (house) for way too long. See below to use household items in drawings & papier-mâché:)

An example is the “Ode to Helen Rosner’s Roast Chicken” by Agnes Barton, 39 from Corvallis, Oregon. She has been crafting with the things around her house during the pandemic. Barton-Sabo used “flour, water, masking tape, two issues of the New Yorker and acrylic paint” to share the joys of Helen Rosner’s viral video of “drying chicken skin with a hair dryer.” She wants her artwork during this time to evoke emotions of laughter by her ridiculous imagery (Cavna, 2020).

Another young man, Kristián Mensa in 2016 (before the pandemic), also reimagined every day objectsto talented pieces of artwork! “To create these whimsical compositions, Mensa pairs…items with minimalist drawings that incorporate the 3D elements among bold lines.” He takes half of an orange (peeled) to use for the back of a turtle or a row of paintbrushes and draws a man mowing over them (Barnes, 2016).

Thankfully, we have outlandish artwork like these due to the work of the impressionists in the 19th century who wanted to go against the “rigid and carefully finished images of the Académies des Beaux-Arts (historical subjects, realistic themes and portraits)” and instead pushed for color, emotion, personality, and imagination in landscape and still life. It also opened the way, for a new modern medium, photography– which at first impressionists thought it “devalued their art skill” until they curved their perception and “sought to express nature and modern city life” in their own pieces (Lumen Learning, N/A) 

Here is a painting from Dina D’ Argo, 56, from Springfield, Tennessee, whom used acrylic paints to paint “In the Void.” The painting shares the emotion of “stepping into the unknown.” As humans, we can’t see what is up ahead and so we move with uncertainty into the future. “The veil symbolizes not only the unwillingness to accept reality, but also our cultural preoccupation with covering or uncovering one’s face, and what it represents or says about who we are as a society…” The floating finally reminds the viewer that we must accept the chaos and go with the flow of life (Cavna, 2020)

How creative have your kids been during quarantine? Share with us! Email your images of artwork: claire@clairescreativeadventures.com with the subject line reading, “Quarentine Artwork” or tag your artwork on your social media accounts: Instagram: @clairescreative OR Facebook: @clairescreativeadventures and send us a quick instant message saying that you sent your artwork.

Works Cited

Barnes, Sara (2016). Teenage Artist Playfully Adds Everyday Objects to Complete Clever Illustrations. Website retrieved from https://mymodernmet.com/kristian-mensa-real-object-illustrations/?fbclid=IwAR1efUkHEHqKjhQb40u4MV81atm4KcyaZCArfqOJsDbTxX_A_CZsYy4cGPw

Cavna, Michael (2020). The best art created by Washington Post readers during the Pandemic. Website retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/arts-entertainment/2020/07/06/art-pandemic-readers/?arc404=true

Lumen Learning (Unknown). Impressionism. Website retrieved from